NBA trade board 2024 updates: Everything to know about every key player on the market


The Athletic has live coverage of the 2024 NBA trade deadline. Follow along for updates.

It’s finally here: NBA Trade Deadline week. Pencils go down after Thursday.

The first dominos fell early this year with the New York Knicks and Toronto Raptors setting aside their ongoing litigation to complete a deal involving OG Anunoby, RJ Barrett and Immanuel Quickley. The second big one fell in January as the Raptors traded Pascal Siakam to the Indiana Pacers for a package centered around Bruce Brown Jr. and three first-round picks. Those deals took two of the biggest names off the market.

Then, someone other than Toronto finally made a move, Detroit and Washington completed a deal, and the Miami Heat acquired Terry Rozier for Kyle Lowry and a first-round pick. And of course, it’s worth noting we got an enormous one in the opening weeks of the season, as James Harden was moved to the Clippers from the 76ers. Because of all that action earlier in the cycle, it’s felt a bit quiet heading into the deadline. There does not seem to be a lot of star power available to be moved. Several team and league sources, who were granted anonymity in order to speak freely, do not expect a particularly wild deadline.

Having said that, there is a lot for teams to gain and lose over this week. While it’ll mostly be role players on the move, these guys could play critical roles in shaping the rest of the season.

Teams like the Los Angeles Lakers and Golden State Warriors should look to shake up their rosters to make a run. The title picture seems open, which means contenders like Oklahoma City, Denver, Minnesota, Boston and others should look to iron out their flaws. Others, like the Charlotte Hornets and Washington Wizards, will look to sell as they continue to fall further out of the race. With so much at stake, I wonder if we see some floodgates open as we get closer to Thursday’s 3 p.m. deadline.

So let’s take a look at some of the remaining players available on the market. After starting with 25 names, then moving to 40, we’ve expanded out to 50, and we could have added more. (This list will also be updated as players are traded and/or more intel comes in.)

Before we get to the names on this list, I want to address a few that aren’t here — at least not yet.

  • You won’t see all-stars Donovan Mitchell or Lauri Markkanen. My impression from talking to league sources is that the Cleveland Cavaliers are planning to ride out this season with Mitchell, especially given their hot run over the last month. Meanwhile, the price tag on Markkanen is so high that it effectively takes him off the market.
  • You also won’t see Zach LaVine. After featuring highly on the first two iterations of this list, he has been removed due to his season-ending foot injury. It seems exceedingly unlikely he will be traded while hurt.
  • Jerami Grant is not on here. It remains tough to gauge the Portland Trail Blazers’ willingness to move him, as well as how other teams value his five-year, $160 million contract.
  • There are four Brooklyn Nets players on this edition, with Dorian Finney-Smith, Dennis Smith Jr. and Spencer Dinwiddie joining Royce O’Neale. However, Mikal Bridges does not feature here, as the Nets have been telling teams they want to hold onto him. Nic Claxton was another player under consideration, but I did not place him because he has been vocal about how much he enjoys Brooklyn, which makes him more of a likely candidate to re-sign this summer. It’s not impossible he could move if someone blew them away, but it doesn’t exactly feel like he’s on the block, either.
  • Jalen Green remains off this list for now, despite Houston’s desire to upgrade its roster.

Click on each player listed below for a detailed explanation of their current trade situations and some of their best potential fits.

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The Hawks clearly want to make some changes, and moving Murray represents the most substantive one they could make this season. The backcourt combination of Trae Young and Murray has not worked as well as the Hawks expected when they traded three first-round picks and a pick swap to acquire Murray from San Antonio. Atlanta’s hope was that pairing Young with a bigger, defensively conscious, playmaking guard like Murray would allow Young to thrive on or off the ball and would stop the Hawks from hemorrhaging points when he left the floor. Murray, who was coming off an All-Star season, was an intriguing bet.

Ultimately, it’s become clear the Hawks should want the ball in Young’s hands as much as possible. While Murray has made strides as a 3-point shooter — he’s hitting 39 percent on six attempts per game this season — he’s not as impactful off the ball as he is on it, which has diminished his overall impact. Additionally, Murray’s strong defense has taken a dive from its previous heights in San Antonio, when he was an All-Defense-level performer. He still gets steals occasionally but hasn’t been quite as engaged off the ball this season. Any team acquiring Murray is doing so in large part because it believes his play on that end rebounds.

Murray signed a four-year, $114 million extension this summer with a player option in 2027, meaning he’s locked in for the long term. If he gets back to his prior defensive heights upon leaving his current messy situation in Atlanta, his average annual value of about $28 million is a reasonable price tag. But any team acquiring him should probably do so with an eye toward returning him to the lead guard spot.

Trade value

First-round pick and a prospect

Best fits

Lakers, Warriors, Heat, Nets, Knicks, Magic, Pelicans

team logo 65

Contract Value

18.2 million

Expiration

2028 (player option)

Guard

Lakers

Warriors

Heat

Nets

Knicks

Magic

Pelicans

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DeRozan is the more traditional trade candidate of the Chicago scoring duo. In a normal world, with the Bulls being a clear candidate to reshape the roster, DeRozan would be the most obvious name on the trade market. However, we can never be too sure with the Bulls, who have climbed into the Play-In race and currently sit in ninth in the Eastern Conference entering Monday.

DeRozan is still an excellent player, a dynamic midrange scorer who, like clockwork, tends to make around 47 percent of his midrange pull-up jumpers while being able to create them at will. His passing and playmaking for teammates have been quite strong, and he seems to have taken on a strong leadership role for some of the younger Bulls players.

It’s hard to overemphasize DeRozan’s consistent value to Chicago over the last two seasons before this one. Estimated Plus-Minus rates him as adding 22.2 wins over that span, and he’s one of just 15 players to post double-figure totals in that metric in each campaign.

Any resolution to DeRozan’s status on the trade market will come down to what DeRozan wants. Is he aiming to leave to try to win a title, or does he want to stick with the Bulls and potentially sign an extension? If he tells the Bulls he isn’t interested in sticking around past this season, moving him makes sense, with his hometown Lakers as an obvious, intriguing destination.

Trade value

First-round pick

Best fits

Lakers, Heat, 76ers

team logo 73

Contract Value

$28.6 million

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The Wizards should be in no rush to move on from Kuzma, having just signed him to a four-year, $90 million contract many around the league view as a long-term bargain. The contract’s value drops each season, going down to $19.4 million in the 2026-27 campaign, which comes after revenue from the new national television deal will raise the league’s salary cap.

I also think Kuzma is a bit underrated. He’s a capable shooter and shot creator from the wing who is miscast as a No. 1 option in Washington, but can be a strong No. 3 or No. 4 option for a good team. While his defense — and the rest of the Wizards’ — has not been up to par this season, he proved during his past Lakers tenure he can lock in when necessary to add value as a switchable wing. He’s not going to be a defensive stopper, but he can get to break-even or better while adding real offensive value.

League sources peg Kuzma’s current price tag to be something in the vein of two first-round picks or equivalent value. I’m skeptical another team will meet that price, so we’ll see if the Wizards have any wiggle room or if the marketplace substantially changes before February. Kuzma will likely maintain his value going into the summer, so the Wizards can be patient.

Trade value

First-round pick and a prospect

Best fits

Kings, Heat, Mavericks

team logo 63

Contract Value

$25.6 million

Forward

Kings

Heat

Mavericks

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Every team in the postseason race would have a use for a player like Caruso. He proved he can be an integral rotation player on a title team with the Lakers in the 2019-20 season and has only improved since then.

He is, for my money, the best defensive guard in the NBA. He flies around on that end, making wild anticipatory rotations with active hands that disrupt every exchange and bother every potential jumper. On the ball, he can handle just about anyone at the one through three positions and can even switch onto the less powerful fours.

On offense, Caruso reads plays incredibly quickly while processing the game at an elite level. He has a pristine understanding of spacing, can make touch passes in transition or in the half court and always makes the extra pass to generate a great shot. There is no selfishness to his game. While he’s typically been a reluctant shooter, he’s upped his volume from distance substantially this season while converting at a career high rate. To top it off, he’s signed to an incredible contract that pays him less than $10 million in each of the next two seasons.

If the Bulls decide to move Caruso, as they should given their need to rebuild, there would be a genuine bidding war. Every contender should bend over backward to acquire a player like him who is low-usage yet elite without the ball in his hands. And because his contract is so small, nearly every team in the league has enough matching salary to get involved.

I debated leaving Caruso off this list entirely. The Bulls have been reluctant so far to engage in Caruso trade discussions, according to The Athletic’s Shams Charania, which lines up with the impression I’ve received from sources on other teams who have tried to reach out.

But Caruso is much more valuable to a contender than he is to this Bulls team. He’s 30 years old, with a history of injuries due to how hard he plays, and the Bulls are more than 18 months away from contending. Given the price Caruso is likely to fetch due to the wide market of teams interested in acquiring him, it’s hard for me (and other executives league-wide) to fathom why the Bulls wouldn’t move him.

Trade value

First-round pick and a prospect

Best fits

Warriors, Mavericks, Bucks, Pacers, Thunder, Lakers, 76ers, Heat, Timberwolves, Nuggets, Kings, Pelicans, Rockets

team logo 73

Contract Value

$9.5 million

Expiration

2025 (team option)

Guard

Warriors

Mavericks

Bucks

Pacers

Thunder

Lakers

76ers

Heat

Timberwolves

Nuggets

Kings

Pelicans

Rockets

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Bogdanović is in the midst of a strong season while the struggling Hawks are clearly looking to make a shift. As of Feb. 6, he’s averaging 17.1 points, 3.1 rebounds and 2.7 assists for the full season, but he’s been even hotter since the mid-point of November.

Beyond that, Bogdanović has a history of stepping up in big moments. He posted a 62.0 true shooting percentage while averaging 13.7 points in 26 minutes per game in the Hawks’ last two postseason appearances, made the All-FIBA World Cup Team in 2019 and 2023 and won multiple Finals MVP awards in Europe before coming to the NBA. One downside with Bogdanović is his tendency to pick up injuries; he hasn’t played in more than 63 games in a season since 2019.

The Hawks, as of late, seem less interested in dealing Bogdanović than a few of their other players lower on this list. The 31-year-old is in the first year of a four-year contract, but the final season is a team option and the annual financial commitment declines in value over the deal’s life. It would take a significant offer to pry him from Atlanta.

Trade value

First-round pick and expiring salary

Best fits

Lakers, Cavaliers, Heat, Magic, Timberwolves

team logo 65

Contract Value

$18.7 million

Expiration

2027 (team option)

Guard

Lakers

Cavaliers

Heat

Magic

Timberwolves

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It’ll be interesting to see how the Raptors decide to handle Brown’s unique situation. He was moved by the Pacers to the Raptors in the Pascal Siakam trade, and it’s easy to see him as a player who could move again before the Feb. 8 deadline.

Much like Alex Caruso, Brown is the kind of player who holds much more value to a contender than he does a rebuilding team. He’s a terrific defender at 6-foot-4 with real length who can fly around the court and provide toughness. On offense, he’s a sharp ball mover who consistently keeps the flow of the offense by processing the court well and making the right reads to find his teammates in rhythm.

That’s how he ended up playing a critical role on the NBA Champion Denver Nuggets last season, finishing sixth on the team in playoff minutes and third in regular-season minutes. That resulted in an enormous two-year, $45 million contract with the Pacers last summer, with the second year being a team option.

That contract creates an enormous amount of flexibility for the Raptors, his current team. They can keep him to play next to Immanuel Quickley and Scottie Barnes, hoping he helps facilitate their development and aids a Raptors Play-In push, and wait to consider moving him until the summer. Alternatively, Toronto can cash in now, using the bevy of teams likely interested in having Brown as they gear up for playoff races.

Brown’s deal would have quite a bit of value on draft night, where the Raptors figure to be major players now that they possess multiple first-round picks following the Siakam deal. The Raptors can decline his team option and end up with cap space anyway, so they retain flexibility to trade him then to a team who wants Brown, but may not have a mechanism to acquire him otherwise.

Trade value

First-round pick

Best fits

Thunder, Kings, 76ers, Knicks, Heat, Lakers, Mavericks, Warriors

team logo 72

Contract Value

$22 million

Expiration

2025 (team option)

Guard

Thunder

Kings

76ers

Knicks

Heat

Lakers

Mavericks

Warriors

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The Kings are looking to upgrade on defense, and using Huerter to do it is a natural potential option. This season has been a roller coaster for the 6-foot-7 guard. He has games where he can’t miss; he went on a 14-game heater at the start of November that saw him drill 41.2 percent from 3. From Dec. 8 until Jan. 7, Huerter’s 3-point percentage dropped to well below 30 percent, and he even got benched momentarily. But since Jan. 14, he’s been nuclear hot, averaging 15.5 points while drilling 45 percent from 3 on seven attempts per game.

Huerter has consistently made between 38 and 40 percent from 3 on high volume throughout his five-and-a-half-year career. Even when he isn’t making shots, he finds ways to impact the game as a sharp cutter and smart team defender.

However, even with his timely rotations and general effort, Huerter’s athletic limitations on defense hinder the Kings’ current roster. They need a legitimate plus stopper on the wing, and that’s not Huerter. It becomes hard for this specific Kings team to have him on the court in important moments if he’s not shooting well. That makes him a relatively expendable player to an already high-powered Kings offense.

Even if the Kings are looking for an upgrade, Huerter remains a solid, starter-quality NBA player on an eminently reasonable contract. He’d be a good get for just about any team, even if this year hasn’t been his best.

Trade value

First-round pick, salary matching in a bigger trade

Best fits

Raptors, Magic, Wizards

team logo 92

Contract Value

$15.7 million

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Finney-Smith is a useful, defensively inclined role player on a solid contract for his on-court contributions. At 6-foot-7 with long arms, good quickness and a strong base, Finney-Smith is exceedingly switchable across the defensive spectrum and consistently makes the right anticipatory reads and rotations. He’s not quite an All-Defensive-level stopper, but he’s a real plus player on that end.

Acquired in the Nets’ deal to send Kyrie Irving to the Mavericks last season, Finney-Smith was viewed as a player who could be useful to the Nets if they tried to win now or valuable if they decided to move him. He has one more guaranteed year at $14.9 million after this season, then a player option for $15.4 million in 2025-26 when he’ll be 32 years old; that decision will be interesting to track. Now that the Nets are nowhere near contending, it seems like the right time for them to try to cash in. Any acquiring team would be able to get at least one-and-a-half seasons of Finney-Smith, so he’s not a mere rental.

Many teams could use a low-usage wing who can defend across the position spectrum and hit 38 percent of his 3s. Honestly, he’d at least be in the rotation of any contender. His ability to take on tough matchups against bigger wing creators in the playoffs is coveted in the highest-leverage moments.

Trade value

First-round pick

Best fits

Lakers, Thunder, Kings, Cavaliers, Bucks, Pacers

team logo 70

Contract Value

13.9 million

Expiration

2026 (player option)

Forward

Lakers

Thunder

Kings

Cavaliers

Bucks

Pacers

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Brogdon has weirdly been in and out of the Blazers’ starting lineup, with stints coming off the bench mixed in with extended stretches of 35-minute-per-game averages. More recently, he’s been a clear starter, averaging 19 points and seven assists in his nine games since re-entering the lineup.

There is every indication last season’s Sixth Man of the Year could help teams that need backcourt reinforcements — especially those seeking real offensive punch. He’s been a useful player for the Blazers as they continue to rebuild following the Damian Lillard trade. Brogdon has been especially helpful in Portlanc’s efforts to bring rookie Scoot Henderson along slowly as he experiences the normal trials of being a teenage lead guard in the NBA.

Brogdon’s contract isn’t for an overly aggressive amount if he continues to produce. Teams like the Lakers and Magic, who could use a bit of shooting and backcourt punch, make a ton of sense for Brogdon if they don’t want to shell out premium assets for other players.

Brogdon’s injury history is worth considering, as he hasn’t played more than 67 games since his rookie season in 2016-17. That’ll probably keep his price point to something in the ballpark of a late first-round pick.

Trade value

Late first-round pick

Best fits

Magic, Lakers, Jazz, Heat, Pelicans

team logo 81

Contract Value

$22.5 million

Guard

Magic

Lakers

Jazz

Heat

Pelicans

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With the Hornets trading Terry Rozier and starting the process of rebuilding around LaMelo Ball, Brandon Miller and Mark Williams, all bets are off for the rest of the roster.

Washington is probably the veteran the team has the least urgency to move. The Hornets signed him to a three-year, $48 million contract this offseason after a protracted restricted free agency situation. But it wouldn’t be a surprise if they looked to get him off their books and if another team valued him enough to give up assets in a trade.

This hasn’t been Washington’s best season, as he’s struggled to shoot it from 3 and seen his role reduced as the team has re-integrated Miles Bridges and drafted Miller. Generally, Washington’s role has felt a bit unsettled. He started for the first 12 games of the season, averaging 17 points and six rebounds per game in the first 10 of those. Then, after a pair of rough performances, the Hornets moved him to the bench in favor of Bridges. Washington has missed a few games here and there with foot and shoulder injuries, which could have brought about some issues in his play. Now, he’s back in the starting lineup, though it’s unclear for how long.

Much like with many players on the Hornets, I don’t have a great sense of Washington’s league-wide value. Would teams see his contract as valuable if he can rebound to his previous level? Would they see it as an overpay for what he’s done as an NBA player so far? Would they be willing to bet on him improving, as he’s 25 years old and theoretically entering his prime? I think the Hornets could likely get good draft or prospect capital for Washington from some team, but they don’t have to move him now, either.

Trade value

Late first-round pick or equivalent value

Best fits

Mavericks, Kings, Cavaliers, Bucks, Warriors

team logo 64

Contract Value

16.8 million

Forward

Mavericks

Kings

Cavaliers

Bucks

Warriors

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Hunter is another Hawks player who could move in the team’s potential shake-up, even after committing to a long-term contract extension that just kicked in this season. An older player when he was selected No. 4 overall in the 2019 NBA Draft, the 26-year-old Hunter has appeared to reach his fully realized form since his second season in the league.

His skill set is polarizing for scouts league-wide. Some evaluators love Hunter’s ability to take on tough defensive matchups against bigger, longer wings. At 6-foot-8 with a 7-foot-2 wingspan, he’s always been a terrific on-ball, one-on-one defender who can at least make life harder for the league’s best scorers.

However, he’s never been a particularly aggressive or disruptive team defender off the ball. Hunter was drafted with the hope he could fix Atlanta’s defense, but the Hawks have never ranked in the top 20 in points allowed per 100 possessions since he arrived.

On offense, Hunter can make open catch-and-shoot 3s but doesn’t tend to take a ton of them, often preferring to find his way into midrange areas. Hawks coach Quin Snyder has at least helped Hunter excise some of those shots from his profile. Hunter is more long than he is quick, so it’s relatively easy for his man to stay in front of him on drives. That exacerbates his struggles as a passer, as he rarely forces any sort of help rotations when attacking the basket.

It appears Hunter is a bit more limited than the remaining three years and $70 million on his contract suggests. However, he can still be an effective 3-and-D wing in an NBA that is constantly on the lookout for size and length that can hold up in the playoffs.

Having said that, Hunter, much like teammate Bogdan Bogdanović, has a tendency to get hurt and miss games. He’s largely been out of the Hawks lineup since mid-December following a procedure on his right knee.

Trade value

Late first-round pick or equivalent value

Best fits

Cavaliers, Kings, Mavericks

team logo 65

Contract Value

$20.1 million

Forward

Cavaliers

Kings

Mavericks

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Memphis is less likely to move Kennard now that they’ve traded Steven Adams to Houston in a trade designed to help clear their books going into the offseason. However, the Grizzlies still project to be over the luxury tax next season. If they wanted to avoid that, they could move Kennard, who has value on the trade market and would represent a significant offensive upgrade for teams looking for more shooting.

Kennard may be one of the 10 best shooters in NBA history. If you think that’s an exaggeration, consider that, since 2020-21, he has made 45.9 percent of his five 3-pointers per game while averaging 10 points per contest. There have been 80 seasons in NBA history in which players have shot at least 44 percent from 3 on at least 3.5 attempts per game. The only players to do it at least three times are Stephen Curry, Kyle Korver, Steve Nash … and Kennard. (And he’s on pace to do it again this season.) On top of that, Kennard is a shifty playmaker and a sharp passer.

Kennard is, undeniably, a below-average defender at best. But he can legitimately help a playoff team’s second unit — or even serve as a fifth starter with the right lineup around him.

His contract, which will pay him $14.8 million this season and possesses a team option for the same amount next season, provides some flexibility. Any acquiring team could use him as a season-long rental, a longer-term player and/or a tradable asset in the summer. Of course, the Grizzlies could easily hang onto him and take him into next season for those same reasons, so it’ll take a real offer to pry him out of Memphis.

Beyond Kennard, don’t be surprised to see Memphis consolidate its collection of younger wings following the emergence of Vince Williams and G.G. Jackson. I don’t see the Grizzlies moving either of those two, but they could deal any combination of Jake LaRavia, Ziaire Williams, David Roddy and/or John Konchar. None are actively on the trade block, so they’re not ranked on this list. But the Grizzlies could stand to re-align their roster.

Trade value

Late first-round pick

Best fits

Rockets, Timberwolves, Magic, Jazz, Pelicans

team logo 83

Contract Value

$14.8 million

Expiration

2025 (team option)

Guard

Rockets

Timberwolves

Magic

Jazz

Pelicans

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Now finally receiving an opportunity to be a full-time starter, Jones is taking his chance and running with it. He distributes the ball well, avoids turnovers at an elite level, deploys his signature floater in the lane and picks his spots well around the rim.

The big leap for Jones this season has been his shooting. After a slow start, he’s in the midst of the longest extended hot streak of his career, having drilled more than 50 percent of his 3s since mid-December. If Jones can keep shooting as he has this season, he’s a legitimate NBA starter.

There is another side to the floor, though. The Wizards’ starting lineup with Jones has been a horror show defensively, and minutes with Jones, Jordan Poole and Kyle Kuzma together have been especially bad. I think Poole’s carelessness on both ends has been by far the biggest culprit — his poor shot selection on offense leads to transition opportunities for opponents — but the Jones-Poole duo on the perimeter is undersized and yields a lot of dribble penetration. I don’t think Jones’ defense has been demonstrably worse than it was in previous seasons, but it was never a real positive. Additionally, Jones hasn’t been a great playoff performer in the past, though his potential improvement as a shooter could really help.

I don’t think the Wizards are likely to get a first-round pick for him alone. His contract is not extendable, as he only signed a two-year deal back in 2022. But perhaps his expiring contract and utility make him valuable to playoff teams willing to attach a first-round pick or other future assets of equivalent value to offload a longer-term deal.

Trade value

High second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Heat, Timberwolves, Jazz, Cavaliers, 76ers

team logo 63

Contract Value

$14.0 million

Guard

Heat

Timberwolves

Jazz

Cavaliers

76ers

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Capela is another effective Hawks player on the trade market. You may be asking how the Hawks are so bad if all of these guys are good. Honestly, I’m surprised the Quin Snyder coaching hire hasn’t worked out better.

Nevertheless, the Hawks’ defensive structure has been a mess, and that includes Capela’s interior presence. His guards haven’t helped him a ton, but he’s looked a step slower this season defending in space and in drop coverage on pick-and-rolls. That could be the effect of multiple Achilles injuries that have nagged Capela for a few seasons now; he’s missed a couple of games in January dealing with right Achilles soreness.

When he’s right, Capela is a terrific screen-and-roll player who can attack the glass on both ends, finish above the rim and contest shots in the paint. Capela, however, is shooting his worst percentage from the field since his third NBA season and hardly looks as bouncy as he’s been previously.

Still, with minimal center choices available on the market, this version of Capela could be useful for a contender that needs size. Even in a down year, he’s still averaging 12 points and 11 rebounds per game. He has only one season left on his deal, so he won’t add unreasonable money to a team’s long-term books.

Trade value

High second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Mavericks, Rockets, Thunder

team logo 65

Contract Value

$20.6 million

Center

Mavericks

Rockets

Thunder

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Russell became eligible to be traded on Jan. 15 after signing a new contract this offseason, and the Lakers are in the market for an upgrade. There’s too much skill-set overlap between him and Austin Reaves, with the latter being a better, more valuable player for the Lakers at this point. Russell takes more bad shots out of the flow of the offense and seems to hold onto the ball for too long.

As part of contract negotiations with the Lakers, Russell agreed to waive veto power over a trade in exchange for receiving a player option for next season. That means the Lakers anticipated the possibility of moving him in an in-season trade as far back as last summer.

Recently, Russell has at least made it a bit harder for the Lakers to move him. He’s averaging 24 points in his last 13 games while shooting 46.6 percent from 3 on nine attempts per game. He’s been on fire. Still, Russell goes through these hot stretches from time to time, and it’s hard to forget him being exceedingly unreliable late in last season’s playoffs.

Ultimately, Russell’s contract is not favorable to the Lakers or the team that acquires him. If this hot run continues, he would opt out and hit unrestricted free agency. If he reverts to the player he was before this hot run, where he averaged 10.8 points on 41 percent from the field and 33 percent from 3, he probably opts in and becomes a player with an unfavorable contract.

The best plan for the Lakers remains using Russell as a trade chip in the coming days, even with how well he’s playing.

Trade value

Expiring salary (pending player option)

team logo 89

Contract Value

$17.3 million

Expiration

2025 (team option)

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Paul’s inclusion on this list says more about the Warriors than Paul himself. Still the NBA’s consummate floor general at 38 years old, Paul was averaging 7.2 assists per game in 27 minutes a night before fracturing his hand. He will miss a few more weeks of action.

Prior to the injury, Paul had been useful running Golden State’s second unit and occasionally filling in as a starter when other absences forced the team’s hand. He’s not at the all-star level he was even two years ago, but he’s still a valuable NBA player due to his basketball IQ.

More than that, Paul’s contract represents the easiest mechanism for the Warriors to try to acquire a difference-maker to save their season. His deal, which amounts to a $30 million expiring contract since the 2024-25 season is non-guaranteed, allows general manager Mike Dunleavy Jr. and company to get involved in every potential negotiation on the market, including the Pascal Siakam or Dejounte Murray sweepstakes, if they really wanted.

The general feeling around the league is that the Warriors are open for business and are willing to discuss a variety of different players to shake things up after a rough start to the season. However, Golden State is not enthusiastic about potentially moving youngsters Jonathan Kuminga and Moses Moody, according to league sources not authorized to speak publicly. Neither is off the table if the right deal comes along, but it would be unfair to say they’re on the block at this stage, even as the Warriors look to alter their roster.

Trade value

Expiring salary

team logo 88

Contract Value

$30.8 million

Expiration

2025 (non-guaranteed)

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I don’t think the Bucks would be excited about moving Portis, as he’s a valuable offensive big man who can space the floor and provide toughness on the interior. He averages 12.6 points per game while shooting 50 percent from the field, 38 percent from 3 and 77.9 percent from the line. Plus, he gets seven rebounds a game and is more than willing to stand up for his teammates when the time comes. Honestly, his veteran presence wouldn’t be an easy thing to remove from the locker room. Portis’ game has holes defensively, but he is a solid player in an NBA desperate for big-man depth.

And yet, Portis is also, by far, the Bucks’ most expendable high-salary player. He is on a reasonable deal for his production, which pays him $12.6 million next season before he has a player option for $13.4 million in 2025-26. If the Bucks feel they need to make a move to improve their defense, using Portis and the high 2024 second-round pick they own from the Portland Trail Blazers offers a genuine route to do it.

Trade value

Player for player trade

Best fits

Nets, Hornets, Hawks, Pacers, Mavericks

team logo 77

Contract Value

$11.7 million

Expiration

2026 (player option)

Forward

Nets

Hornets

Hawks

Pacers

Mavericks

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I did not envision Tate being a trade possibility coming into the season, as Rockets general manager Rafael Stone is known league-wide to be a big fan of Tate’s.

However, it appears his role is dwindling within the Rockets rotation. While Tate started games with Dillon Brooks and Tari Eason injured, he appeared to be behind Brooks, Eason, Jalen Green and Jabari Smith Jr. in the pecking order on the wing and at the four earlier in the season. Rookie Cam Whitmore’s recent rise into the Rockets’ rotation has made Tate’s place even more precarious, as has the Rockets’ decision to use No. 4 pick Amen Thompson as a wing in his 15 or so minutes per game.

While Tate can be a good veteran on a Rockets team competing for a playoff spot this year, his value league-wide might exceed his likely role in Houston. A number of teams possess trade exceptions big enough to absorb Tate’s relatively cheap 2023-24 salary in exchange for draft pick capital, and several others are in need of an athletic, defensive-minded, unselfish frontcourt player to plug a gap in their rotations.

I don’t expect the Rockets to simply give Tate away, but the pathway toward him remaining a rotation player in Houston over the long haul has become narrower with the team continuing to accumulate young, athletic wings. Including Tate in a trade could be a good way for the Rockets to find an answer at backup center behind emerging star Alperen Şengün.

Trade value

High second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Celtics, Nuggets, Bucks, Heat

team logo 84

Contract Value

$6.5 million

Expiration

2025 (team option)

Forward

Celtics

Nuggets

Bucks

Heat

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Beyond 27-year-old forwards Mikal Bridges and Cam Johnson, the Nets don’t have a lot of younger talent to be excited about in the future, especially if Nic Claxton leaves in free agency this summer. They’re still firmly in the Play-In picture right now, but only because the bottom of the East has been a mess.

That makes O’Neale, a versatile wing on an expiring contract who a real contender would love to have coming off its bench, as a trade candidate. He still hits 3s at a 37-percent clip, passes well and rarely turns it over. Defensively, he still can ratchet up the pressure and force live-ball turnovers even if he’s not quite the All-Defense-level defender he was at his peak with the Jazz.

I don’t think O’Neale will return a first-round pick, but he might yield some lower-level draft capital for a Nets team that needs all the youth it can find, regardless of the franchise’s overall direction.

Trade value

High second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Nuggets, Bucks, Timberwolves, Pacers, Mavericks

team logo 70

Contract Value

$9.5 million

Guard

Nuggets

Bucks

Timberwolves

Pacers

Mavericks

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It’s still a bit surprising that Trent chose to opt in to his $18.6 million salary this season, as doing so only made sense if he had a long-term extension lined up that would guarantee him a significant amount of money. But here we are, with Trent on an expiring deal and set to hit unrestricted free agency next summer.

Trent has rebounded recently from a tough start to the season, even after he initially moved back to the bench after a couple of starts prior to the Raptors’ trade for Immanuel Quickley and RJ Barrett. He has been nuclear hot from 3 over his last 10 games since re-entering the starting lineup, hitting 49.3 percent from 3 in that stretch. Any team looking for a floor-spacer should at least take a look at Trent.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

team logo 72

Contract Value

$18.6 million

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Smith is one of my favorite stories of the last few years and one of the best low-cost targets across the league if the Nets decide to move him.

Once a top-10 pick as a point guard with elite physical tools and offensive potential, Smith has remade himself into a defensive savant. He’s one of the best point-of-attack defenders in the NBA, a genuine pest whose presence improved the defenses of Charlotte and Brooklyn in each of the last two seasons. Per Taylor Snarr’s Estimated Plus Minus model, Smith has been the fourth-best defensive guard in the league this season. That lines up with the film I’ve watched, which shows him constantly being aggressive, fighting through screens and frustrating potential drivers with his strength and lateral quickness.

Offensively, Smith continues to make strides as an early decision-maker in ball screens and is good at getting the ball in the hands of teammates who can create better than he can. He will also take his chances in transition when they come. However, he’s a non-shooter from the perimeter and is unlikely to be guarded tightly in the playoffs.

Still, his price point shouldn’t be exorbitant. He can swing a couple of playoff games with six-minute defensive stretches if a team can use him properly. He’s also on an expiring minimum salary, so every team can bid for him.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Bucks, Pacers, Warriors, Kings, Suns, Timberwolves, Rockets

team logo 70

Contract Value

$2.0 million

Guard

Bucks

Pacers

Warriors

Kings

Suns

Timberwolves

Rockets

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Anybody need a solid backup center option signed to a completely reasonable contract? Richards is your guy. He’s active on the interior, rebounds, runs the court and plays within himself. He’s averaging 8.7 points, 7.6 rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game this season while logging the most minutes of his career and starting 19 games,

Richards is athletic, competes with a high motor and has elite measurements for the center position at 7-foot tall with a 7-foot-4 wingspan. He keeps the game simple, and because of that, he can basically fit anywhere. He’s a sensible option for any number of teams looking for a longer-term backup option that won’t break the bank.

In a market where there aren’t many cheap center options, Richards is only 26 and brings a degree of cost control.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Suns, Nuggets, Rockets, Knicks, Pacers, Mavericks, Thunder

team logo 64

Contract Value

$5.0 million

Center

Suns

Nuggets

Rockets

Knicks

Pacers

Mavericks

Thunder

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Trading Fultz is the most likely mechanism for the Magic to get an offensive upgrade. He’s on an expiring $17 million contract, and the Magic played exceedingly well without him during his two-month injury absence.

Since last summer, Jalen Suggs emerged into a core player alongside Paolo Banchero and Franz Wagner, sixth man Cole Anthony signed a contract extension back in October and 2023 first-round pick Anthony Black showed flashes as a starter. It seems unlikely Fultz would want to stay in Orlando with such a crowded, young backcourt group around him.

When healthy, Fultz has looked the part of a lower-end NBA starting point guard even with his shooting limitations. He averaged 14 points and nearly six assists per game last season while playing well on defense and not turning the ball over. His first four games this campaign before his most recent knee injury were largely similar. Turning 26 years old in May, Fultz seems destined to be a point guard teams are quite happy to have as their backup but not all that enthused about as a starter.

The Magic should be on the lookout for more shooting around Banchero, Wagner and Suggs, as the team ranks near the bottom of the league in 3-point attempt rate and 3-point percentage. It often results in Banchero trying to create offense in what resembles a phone booth.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

team logo 67

Contract Value

$17.0 million

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It hasn’t been the best contract-year season for Dinwiddie. He’s averaging 12.7 points and six assists, but is shooting less than 40 percent from the field and 32 percent from 3. On the bright side, his turnovers are down and he generally makes good decisions as a distributor.

Like many players on the Nets, Dinwiddie’s on/off numbers look drastically better when not sharing the court with Cam Thomas. As of Feb. 5, the Nets are being outscored by 9.8 points per 100 possessions with both Thomas and Dinwiddie on the floor, per PBPStats. With Dinwiddie and without Thomas, they outscore opponents by 5.7 points per 100. Without Dinwiddie and with Thomas, they’re at plus-1.7.

Because of his $20.4 million expiring contract, Dinwiddie likely won’t be a primary target for any team. But don’t be surprised if he’s a secondary one for those who miss out on their first options, or for rivals looking to shed long-term salary. For instance, if the Nets want to acquire any of the Hawks’ trade targets, they could send back Dinwiddie to save Atlanta a lot of long-term money. The same goes for Toronto if the Raptors look to shed multi-year salaries.

Trade value

Expiring salary

Best fits

Raptors, Hawks, Lakers, Magic, Heat

team logo 70

Contract Value

$20.4 million

Guard

Raptors

Hawks

Lakers

Magic

Heat

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Drummond will likely be a popular backup center option if the Bulls put him on the market, if only because his cheap contract helps teams bumping up against the luxury tax or second apron.

Drummond can still rebound and uses his big, physical frame to be useful off the bench. He had a good run of play recently while pinch-hitting as a starter for the injured Nikola Vučević.

Drummond wouldn’t return a first-rounder given his foot speed limitations, but the Bulls could probably get a couple of second-rounders for him, much like the Lakers did for Thomas Bryant last winter. Having a big around who can eat minutes behind a starter is valuable, and Drummond has been effective in that role.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Nuggets, Rockets, Knicks, Pacers, Thunder, Mavericks

team logo 73

Contract Value

$3.3 million

Center

Nuggets

Rockets

Knicks

Pacers

Thunder

Mavericks

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It says a lot about Mitchell’s offensive struggles that the Kings have found it hard to get his defensive energy and aggression on the floor. He’s still an absolute menace on defense, flying around with reckless abandon and causing issues at the point of attack for opposing perimeter players. However, he’s been one of the worst offensive players in the league so far this year, posting awful shooting percentages from the field and from 3.

Maybe the 2021 top-10 pick could use a change of scenery, but the biggest pre-draft question with Mitchell was if he’d have enough juice on offense to make it work in the NBA. So far, he hasn’t.

I’m skeptical he’ll have a ton of value on the trade market. I don’t think the Kings are likely to get a first-round pick in return for him.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Raptors, Grizzlies, Pistons, Spurs

team logo 92

Contract Value

$5.1 million

Expiration

2025 (restricted)

Guard

Raptors

Grizzlies

Pistons

Spurs

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Things haven’t gone according to plan for Williams after he signed a four-year, $54 million deal to join Dallas via sign-and-trade. He’s always been limited offensively because he’s not shifty or explosive, but that was fine when he was hitting 40 percent from 3. However, over his last 32 games with the Mavericks, he’s hit just 31 percent of his four 3-point attempts per game.

On top of that, Williams hasn’t fit well in Dallas’ defensive scheme, which has asked him to defend in space a bit more often than Boston’s did. Never particularly fleet of foot, Williams has struggled a bit to stay in front of his man. Players like Dante Exum and Derrick Jones Jr. have been more impactful for the Mavericks this season as they try to construct a passable defense around Luka Dončić and Kyrie Irving.

It will be quite interesting how Williams’ contract will be viewed in the marketplace. Many teams — including, reportedly, Charlotte — had interest in signing him to a deal in the ballpark of his current one. Will those teams consider his season-long regression as a sign of things to come, or merely a product of Dallas being a bad fit?

Dallas could include Williams in a trade to re-set their books a bit this offseason while also acquiring a more immediate upgrade in the frontcourt or on the wing.

Trade value

Player for player trade

Best fits

Hornets, Bucks, Pistons

team logo 87

Contract Value

$12.4 million

Forward

Hornets

Bucks

Pistons

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I’d been fascinated all season by the Miami Heat’s potential strategy at the deadline, and they started to put their cards on the table recently. They moved Kyle Lowry to the bench after he started the first 35 games he played this season. Days later, they moved him and a 2027 first-round pick to the Charlotte Hornets for Terry Rozier. Now, Charlotte can try to move Lowry again.

Playing 28 minutes per night, Lowry is still a basketball genius who limits turnovers and keeps his team’s offense in flow. However, his elite pull-up shooting and ability to separate from defenders has waned, making him more of an off-ball player. As of Jan. 23, 31 percent of his offensive possessions this season came via spot-up situations, per Synergy Sports, a significantly higher rate than in his first two years with Miami. He turns 38 in two months and is starting to show the effects of aging.

Lowry could now be a mechanism for the Hornets to acquire future assets. His expiring $29.6 million contract could be extremely enticing for teams looking to get off long-term money.

Trade value

Expiring salary

Best fits

Raptors, Warriors, Lakers

team logo 64

Contract Value

$29.7 million

Guard

Raptors

Warriors

Lakers

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Wright fits the bill for any team in need of a good backup guard who can log important playoff minutes.

Given that backup point guard is often the spot where opposing teams seek out mismatches in the playoffs, Wright’s ability to run an offense competently and more than hold his own on defense is valuable for teams who stagger their stars’ minutes so they can lead bench units. Wright can be a bit reluctant as a shooter, but he makes the open ones at a decent rate. Plus, he’s reasonably priced, with an $8.2 million expiring contract.

Wright is not going to set the world on fire, but a contender could do worse than him when seeking depth options.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Bucks, Pacers, Kings, Mavericks

team logo 63

Contract Value

$8.2 million

Guard

Bucks

Pacers

Kings

Mavericks

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Anderson has been a part of Minnesota’s rotation this season and provided reasonable minutes on defense with his length and basketball IQ. However, he’s become a real offensive liability because of his perimeter shooting woes. His confidence has seemingly eroded from distance after a few good years in Memphis and a solid low-volume first season in Minnesota.

The 6-foot-9 wing nicknamed ”Slow Mo” can occasionally run an offense off the bench, and makes great decisions on the court. But since he presents no shooting threat whatsoever, it’s tough for the Timberwolves, a team that can struggle to generate efficient offense, to have him on the court unless the ball is in his hands.

The Timberwolves will be operating well over the salary cap moving forward, so converting Anderson’s $9.2 million expiring contract into a longer-term deal has some value. The Timberwolves could desperately use a backup point guard, as they’ve hemorrhaged points whenever Mike Conley is off the floor. It would be a significant issue for Minnesota if either Conley or Anthony Edwards misses any time; the team averages just 103.6 points per 100 possessions without either of them on the court.

The Timberwolves don’t own most of their future first-round picks as a result of 2022’s Rudy Gobert blockbuster trade, but can attach a top-40 second-round pick in this upcoming draft from either Memphis or Washington, as well as an interesting athletic prospect in Josh Minott, to Anderson’s deal to entice rivals. My favorite trade target for them is Washington’s Tyus Jones, which would be a homecoming for the Minneapolis native. Alternatively, Detroit backup extraordinaire Monté Morris is an option if the Timberwolves believe his poor early spell since returning from injury is not indicative of his future play.

Trade value

Expiring salary

Best fits

Wizards, Pistons, Raptors, Bulls, Jazz

team logo 78

Contract Value

$9.2 million

Forward

Wizards

Pistons

Raptors

Bulls

Jazz

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Barnes signed a three-year, $54 million extension over the summer, and I wonder what the Kings think of that contract now.

After a quietly strong and consistent 2022-23 season, he has taken a bit of a step back in 2023-24. Barnes is posting a career-low usage rate as Keegan Murray has stepped up next to him. Barnes has been a bit better over the last month and found a lot more success as a spot-up shooter, but is still performing at a level below last season.

His rebounding, which has never been a strength of his game, is currently at a career-low rate. Defensively, while Barnes will at least fight and body up on bigger players, his feet look a step slower on the perimeter and he has struggled in switch situations.

At this point, I don’t think other teams see Barnes’ contract as particularly valuable to take on. Maybe the Kings use Barnes as part of a bigger deal to consolidate some of their role players into a star-level upgrade, as his salary is useful to make the money work in potential trades.

But Barnes also seems like an option to move if the Kings look to make a smaller change while continuing to build around Domantas Sabonis, De’Aaron Fox and Murray.

Trade value

Salary matching in a bigger trade

team logo 92

Contract Value

$17.0 million

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Vincent, the Lakers’ midlevel exception signing this summer, has missed most of the season because of a left knee injury that needed surgery. If the Lakers need to match salaries in a trade, it’s easy to imagine Vincent on the move. However, it’s also hard to imagine him holding much value right now. He was good last season in the Heat’s Finals run and worth the contract he signed at the time. But he’s also a Miami Heat reclamation project, and — rightfully or wrongfully — teams tend to worry about those players outside of Miami’s unique development structure.

If the Lakers wanted to hang onto D’Angelo Russell following his recent hot streak, they could replace his salary with the combination of those of Vincent, Taurean Prince and 2023 first-round Jalen Hood-Schifino.

Trade value

Salary matching in a bigger trade

Best fits

Hawks, Bulls, Raptors, Trail Blazers

team logo 89

Contract Value

$10.5 million

Guard

Hawks

Bulls

Raptors

Trail Blazers

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The Bucks need to do something to address their defensive issues, and moving Connaughton is an alternative way to do that than parting with Bobby Portis.

Connaughton is in the first season of a three-year, $28.3 million extension that does not look particularly valuable considering the way he’s played this season. Connaughton, who just turned 31, has started to make catch-and-shoot 3s again, but that is the extent of his on-court value at this point. Defensively, he, like the rest of Milwaukee’s perimeter players, has struggled to stay in front of anyone.

Teams won’t be enthusiastic about swallowing Connaughton’s contract, but the Bucks could work out some sort of swap for a better defensive reserve by including a 2024 second-rounder from Portland in the deal.

Trade value

Salary matching in a bigger trade

team logo 77

Contract Value

9.4 million

Expiration

2026 (player option)

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Martin has been outside the 76ers’ rotation this season after playing every game for Houston last season and starting 49 of them. The LA Clippers traded for him over the summer, then included him in this fall’s James Harden trade.

Martin averaged 12.7 points and 5.5 rebounds per game with the Rockets a season ago, making things happen just by being an active athlete on the court. He is among the most explosive leapers in the NBA; he finishes above the rim and can be an excellent cutter. His jumper has been hit or miss throughout his career, but it occasionally falls. Defensively, he has upside, but has yet to meet that promise. Martin’s still only 23 years old, so there is some room for growth in his game.

More than that, his value comes from being on a minimum contract that can fit into anyone’s cap sheet. Any contender looking to take a flyer on a player who could help the back end of their rotation should consider if Martin is an answer. He wouldn’t figure to cost much, seeing as he hits free agency at the end of the year.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Nuggets, Wizards, Bucks, Celtics, Timberwolves, Mavericks

team logo 69

Contract Value

$1.9 million

Forward

Nuggets

Wizards

Bucks

Celtics

Timberwolves

Mavericks

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Horton-Tucker is an interesting player. He’s on an expiring contract, and any team that wants to acquire him could look to extend him if it wants to continue his development.

Still just 23 years old, Horton-Tucker is in his fifth season after being the youngest player in the league as a rookie. He showed some occasional flashes in his first two years with the Lakers, but has essentially plateaued in the ensuing seasons.

He struggles to play without the ball in his hands, but isn’t a good enough scorer or decision-maker to consistently run an offense. He’s capable of playing in ball screens and getting to his spots, but he’s not an effective shooter and has long been turnover prone. I think his passing and playmaking has been a bit better this year, and he has made catch-and-shoot 3s at a reasonable clip. However, while he has defensive tools due to his length, he hasn’t exactly been impressive on that end.

Utah recently pulled him from its rotation while finding success with other options in the backcourt.

I don’t expect Horton-Tucker’s next deal to be as expensive as his current one. Could an enterprising team trade for him with the intention of extending his contract at a reasonable number just before he hits his mid-20s? Could Utah decide to do that? The Jazz could go myriad ways at this deadline, and Horton-Tucker’s deal represents some flexibility for them.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Blazers, Wizards, Spurs

team logo 79

Contract Value

$11.0 million

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The question of what exactly happened to Wiggins is one of the biggest mysteries around the NBA.

Coming off a strong multi-season run in Golden State, Wiggins has been a remarkably ineffective player in 2023-24. Taylor Snarr’s Estimated Plus-Minus model has consistently rated Wiggins as one of the league’s 10 worst players to appear in at least 20 games while logging at least 20 minutes per contest. His 3-point shot and finishing at the rim have abandoned him, and he’s been nowhere near the same defender he was even last season. The Warriors have been outscored by more points in his minutes than those of any other player on the roster, and no one else is even in his ballpark. It’s a bizarre regression.

It’s also an exceedingly problematic regression for the Warriors considering Wiggins is in the first season of a four-year, $109 million contract extension. If he continues at his current level of play, he might own the worst contract in the NBA moving forward.

Wiggins is just 28, so he has time to get back some of the qualities that made him essential to the Warriors’ 2022 title run. This isn’t new territory for Wiggins, considering he wasn’t exactly highly regarded when the Warriors acquired him for D’Angelo Russell in 2020. But the Warriors desperately need a shake-up, and trading Wiggins qualifies.

I’m not convinced there will be a taker for his contract. Maybe the Warriors can find a trade involving Wiggins and another struggling player on a long-term contract to try to reset their careers. Or maybe they can move Wiggins along with draft picks as part of a bigger trade for a strong player.

Regardless, the Wiggins problem is real for the Warriors. They will likely try to fix it in the coming weeks, either by trading him or trading for someone to play instead of him.

Trade value

Salary matching in a bigger trade

Best fits

Mavericks, Pacers

team logo 88

Contract Value

$24.3 million

Expiration

2028 (player option)

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Landale was terrific last season as the Suns’ backup center, even earning minutes over Deandre Ayton in the playoffs through solid ball movement and aggression. That earned him a four-year, $32 million deal from the Rockets, with only the first year guaranteed.

But after injuring his left ankle training with the Australian national team ahead of this summer’s FIBA World Cup, Landale has not been the same player he was just eight months ago. His ineffective play has created issues for Houston all season at backup center behind Alperen Şengün.

With Landale essentially an $8 million expiring deal, the Rockets can use him to acquire a rotation player for the long haul. I’d expect Houston to address its backup big man spot before the deadline, and Landale’s contract is the simplest mechanism to do it.

Trade value

Expiring salary

team logo 84

Contract Value

$8.0 million

Expiration

2027 (last 3 years non-guaranteed)

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The Pistons acquired the longtime Brooklyn Net this offseason as a potential shooting option. Before this season, Harris has been one of the best shooters in league history, drilling about 45 percent of his more than 2,000 3-point attempts since 2018-19.

But he dealt with a shoulder injury this season and has struggled in the minutes he’s played, making just 34 percent from distance. He hasn’t played much even when he’s been active for games.

As the Pistons’ season careens further afield, they could look to make some shake-up moves to avoid the ignominy of having the worst record in league history. If the Pistons look to make a larger shake-up move, Harris’ $19.9 million contract could represent a good chunk of expiring salary for another team. If not, he would be a potential buyout candidate.

Trade value

Expiring salary

team logo 76

Contract Value

$19.9 million

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It’s impossible to separate Bridges’ on-court value from his off-court issues.

Bridges was arrested in June 2022 and pleaded no contest to a felony domestic violence charge in November of that year. He received three years of probation but no jail time as part of a deal with prosecutors. The NBA suspended him in April, and 20 games of the suspension were considered served in the 2022-23 season, meaning Bridges — a restricted free agent at the time of the incident who was not signed last year — had 10 games remaining on the suspension to start this season.

Simply put, some organizations will not have any interest in Bridges under any circumstances. But NBA teams have proven time and again that they’ll look the other way on these sorts of legal transgressions if the player brings them on-court success. And Bridges is productive, averaging more than 20 points per game again while shooting 46 percent from the field, 36 percent from 3 and 87 percent from the line. He grabs seven rebounds and dishes out three assists per game.

Bridges signed his qualifying offer last summer and is on a one-year, $7.9 million deal. With the Hornets under new ownership and now rebuilding around Brandon Miller and LaMelo Ball, it feels unlikely Bridges will be back next summer. He can veto any trade because he’d lose his Bird rights, but that may not matter if the Hornets don’t plan to retain him anyway.

My bet is his market ends up being much worse than expected. Speculatively, the team that ticks the most boxes for him is Phoenix, which could put together a package with Nassir Little’s contract, a minimum salary and multiple second-round picks. Phoenix’s trade flexibility is limited to acquire many other players, with its high salary sheet and the team being over the second apron. There also is a Michigan State connection with new owner Mat Ishbia and Bridges.

Any team that trades for him does so at its own risk of backlash.

Trade value

Second-round pick(s)

Best fits

Suns, Lakers, Timberwolves, Nets, Cavaliers

team logo 64

Contract Value

$7.9 million

Expiration

2024 (can veto a trade)

Forward

Suns

Lakers

Timberwolves

Nets

Cavaliers

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(Illustration by Sean Reilly / The Athletic. Photos: Getty Images)





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