Chicago Bears NFL Draft picks 2024: Grades, fits and scouting reports


The Chicago Bears entered the 2024 NFL Draft on April 25 with four picks over the three-day draft.

The Bears made USC quarterback Caleb Williams the No. 1 pick in the draft. The selection of the 2022 Heisman Trophy winner was viewed as a foregone conclusion after the Bears traded Justin Fields to the Pittsburgh Steelers last month.

Williams immediately becomes QB1 for a franchise and a fan base starved for a star quarterback. The only other quarterbacks on the roster are second-year player Tyson Bagent and journeyman Brett Rypien.

Williams should love the wide receivers he’ll be throwing to in Chicago. The Bears already had veterans DJ Moore and Keenan Allen, then they added Washington’s Rome Odunze with the No. 9 pick on Thursday night.

They could have traded down or taken the first defensive player in the draft, but grabbing one of the top three wide receivers was too tempting to pass up.

On Friday night, the Bears fortified their offensive line depth by selecting Yale offensive tackle Kiran Amegadjie with the No. 75 pick.

go-deeper

GO DEEPER

Bears Day 2 draft takeaways: Caleb Williams unfazed as new era begins in Chicago

Keep coming back here throughout the draft for analysis and grades for each Bears pick.

Round 1

No. 1 (from Panthers): Caleb Williams, QB, USC

How he fits

Most of the concerns regarding Caleb Williams subside if you buy into the idea his risk-taking said more about a weak supporting cast (on both sides of the ball) at USC. I’m interested in seeing how that aspect of his game transfers to Chicago, where the presence of a defensive-minded coach signals less tolerance for risk. Williams will have a couple of solid veteran receivers and a defense that appears solid. He won’t have to carry the Bears as much as he had to carry USC. — Mike Sando

Dane Brugler’s analysis

“Williams needs to be more consistent working on schedule from the pocket, but you live with the hiccups because the positives are special with his dynamic passing skills and instinctive ability to create. Though stylistically he is like a really impressive karaoke-style version of Patrick Mahomes, he is truly unique as a playmaker.”

Kevin Fishbain and Adam Jahns’ analysis

Chicago Bears draft Caleb Williams: How he fits, pick grade and scouting intel

Scott Dochterman’s grade: A

Round 1 grades for all 32 picks

go-deeper

GO DEEPER

Greenberg: All Caleb Williams has to do in Chicago is be himself … and win lots of games

No. 9: Rome Odunze, WR, Washington

How he fits

The Bears have remade their offense in two short years, and by selecting Odunze at No. 9, Chicago has changed the trajectory of the franchise for perhaps the next decade. With Odunze, Keenan Allen and D.J. Moore working with Williams, the Bears have a potentially explosive offense. (Yes, let that sink in.) — Scott Dochterman

Dane Brugler’s analysis

Odunze is an above-average height/weight/speed athlete with the pass-catching instincts and competitive focus to be a playmaking NFL receiver. He projects as a true X receiver and has the skill level to elevate his quarterback’s play (stylistically similar to Drake London).

Kevin Fishbain’s analysis

Chicago Bears draft Rome Odunze: How he fits, pick grade and scouting intel

Scott Dochterman’s grade: A+

Round 1 grades for all 32 picks

go-deeper

GO DEEPER

Dream scenario plays out for Bears as they pair Caleb Williams, Rome Odunze

Round 3

No. 75: Kiran Amegadjie, OT, Yale

How he fits

Bears general manager Ryan Poles is known for addressing the offensive line, so it’s no surprise he did so with this pick. But with glaring holes at defensive tackle and defensive end, he went for boom or bust. Amegadjie (6-5 1/2, 323 pounds) has left tackle arm length (36 1/8) was a two-time All-Ivy League offensive lineman despite playing only four games in 2023 with a torn left quad.

Dane Brugler’s analysis

“Amegadjie is a raw prospect who needs technical and strength work before he sees live NFL reps, but his physical ingredients and competitive drive are the foundational elements that pro coaches want to develop. He projects as a backup left tackle as a rookie who has all the tools to gradually develop into an NFL starter.”

Adam Jahns’ analysis

Chicago Bears draft Kiran Amegadjie: How he fits, pick grade and scouting intel

Scott Dochterman’s grade: C-minus

Nick Baumgardner, Scott Dochterman rate Rounds 2-3

Round 4

No. 122 (from Eagles)

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(Photo of Kiran Amegadjie: Gregory Fisher / USA Today)





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